For each performance assessment in the PALM library, information on the task is shown on the Administration Procedures page and on the Task with Student Directions page. When adapting a performance task, you will need to examine the content on both of these pages. The text below shows a sample adaptation of the Administration Procedures for the "Containers" performance task. The second page shows a sample adaptation of the Task with Student Directions.

Red text shows modified or added text.


 notes explain the changes and
purple text will be eliminated in the final adaptation.


Velocity
Administration Procedures

Grades 5-8 Performance Task
Contributed by: Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO/SCASS)

General Instructions to the Teacher:

This task is designed to take students approximately 40 - 50 50 - 65 minutes to complete.

Students will be working in groups of 4-6 for the experiment/activity part of this exercise.
Students work together for up to 20 minutes. They are instructed to notify you when finished with the group work, and then to go on to the individual work beginning with question #1. If students are still working together 20 minutes after the testing begins, instruct them to cease their group work and begin individual work. At this point, they may no longer talk. Whether or not they are just beginning their individual work, remind students that they now have about 25 minutes to complete the individual activity.
Students should be ready to work as soon as the period begins. Group assignments should be made in advance. The materials should be set out at each lab station, if possible. A central supply area, if needed, should be easily accessible. All supplies should be clearly labeled.

Materials for "Velocity":

At this station students should have:
• self-propelled toy car
• masking tape
• 1 meter stick
• stopwatch or clock with second hand
• 1 pen or pencil per student
graph paper (2 sheets per student)

Advance Preparation:
Care should be taken to use toy cars that are durable and roll along a straight line when released.

The students should work on a clean, flat surface (preferably the floor). If the room is carpeted the experiment will still work, but the tape may not stick as well. The tape will only be used to mark out distances.

Safety:
• Be careful.
• Teachers and students should always exercise appropriate safety precautions and utilize appropriate laboratory safety procedures and equipment when working on science performance tasks.


Velocity
Student Directions

TO THE STUDENT

Welcome to this experimental science exercise. We hope that you will find it interesting and worthwhile. Carefully read through these directions and the directions on the next page before you begin to work.

You may be part of a group for the first part of this exercise. Each group should carry out the experiment and collect the data together, but each student must record the data in his or her own booklet. Be sure to record the data exactly as you observe them. After the data have been collected, each student should answer the questions independently.
After you have finished your experiment and have recorded all of the data, you will be asked to answer some questions about the experiment and the data you recorded. Your answers must be written in this test booklet in the space provided. Make sure that you understand each question before you begin to write. At any time while you are writing your answers, you may look back to the directions for the experiment and the data you collected. Be sure that your answers are written as clearly and neatly as possible.
Before you turn the page, read the list of materials given below and check to make sure that your group has everything listed.

Materials:
• self-propelled toy car
• meter stick
• masking tape
• stopwatch or watch with a second hand
• pen or pencil
graph paper (2 sheets)

AFTER YOU HAVE READ THE DIRECTIONS, TURN TO THE NEXT PAGE AND BEGIN.

Speeding in a School Zone

The speed limit sign in front of your school reads "25 miles per hour" (or 42 km/hour). Your local paper reports that cars frequently exceed the speed limit in the school zone. You want to design an experiment to examine the problem, but you need practice before you actually test cars driving by the school.

You will be working in a group of four students to collect data and share ideas. You will write the conclusions and answer questions on your own.
You are going to determine the average speed of cars as they travel along the floor.
Average speed is equal to distance traveled divided by time (or speed = distance/time).

that the longest distance must be at least 3 times longer than the shortest distance.
2. Determine how long, in seconds, it takes for the car to travel that distance. The same person should release the car and start the stopwatch. Each student should record both the time and the distance on his or her own data sheet.
3. Repeat the process in Step 1 2 three times for each of the six different distances. Be sure that the longest distance is at least three times longer than the shortest distance.
4. Calculate the average speed of the car in cm/sec for each of the three trials at the six distances. Show your work below the data sheet.

5. Use your graph paper to graph the time (sec) for Trials A, B, and C for each distance traveled by car. Be sure to label your graph. (What variable goes on the x-axis? on the y-axis?)
6. Use your graph paper to graph the average speed (cm/sec) for each distance traveled by car. Be sure to label your graph. (What variable goes on the x-axis? on the y-axis?)

Questions:

Please answer the following questions by yourself.

1. Do you think your data is more accurate for long distances or for short distances? Why?
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2. Based on the data you collected, describe the relationship between the distance traveled by your car and time it takes to travel that distance. Explain why are time and distance are related in this way.
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3. Describe in detail an experiment to determine if cars that pass by your school are speeding.
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